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Republicans are narrowing the early voting gap in these states

More than 12 million votes have been cast in these four states, which are crucial in determining the next president.

The schedule of candidates focuses on these states. President Donald Trump And ex Vice President Joe Biden The two campaigned for the state’s 29th election vote in Florida on Thursday. Later, Trump was scheduled to travel to North Carolina, while Vice President Mike Pence planned campaign stops in Iowa and Nevada. Biden will arrive in Iowa on Friday.

In the five days leading up to November 3, here is an in-depth look at who already voted in these key states: Cadalyst, a company that provides data, analysis and other services to Democrats, academics and non-profit issue-advocacy organizations.

Trump beat Florida by one percentage point in the last round.

Over the past week, voters under the age of 30 have seen a slight increase in the share of Florida early voting voters from 8% to 10%. Other ages also saw small increases, further reducing the dominance of Florida’s senior voters 65 or older, from 45% of early voters a week ago, but now only 39%.

Florida’s early voting was slightly different than it was four years ago. The share of Hispanic voters in the pre-election vote has risen from 14% four years ago to 16% now, and the share of black voters has risen from 12% to 13% now. White voters’ votes fell three points from this point in 2016.

Republicans are narrowing the gap in pre-election votes. Democrats are currently leading by four points. A week ago, it was nine points. Party advantage does not predict results – but a nationwide poll shows that many Republicans prefer to vote in person on election day.

North Carolina

Trump defeated Thar Heel State in 2016 by more than three percentage points.

Young people in North Carolina continue to vote in large numbers. Last week, voters under the age of 30 made up 11% of the initial electorate, but that is now more than 12%.

Democrats have lost some of their lead in the pre-election vote. Last week, they had 12 points more than the Republicans in the polls. Currently, it stands at eight points.

In terms of race, white Carolinas already make up 72% of the majority of ballots cast in North Carolina, while Black voters make up 22% of the second ballot. This is almost identical to the ethnic composition of the early voting voters four years ago.

Iowa

Iowa has been a competitive battleground in this cycle since Trump beat Hockey State by more than nine percentage points in 2016. The state also has a major Senate race between current Republican Johnny Ernst and Democratic challenger Theresa Greenfield.

Democrats continue to cast pre-election votes at a much higher rate than Republicans in 2016. With 49% of the pre-election vote, the Democrats are 17 points ahead of the Republicans, at 32%. However, Republicans narrowed the gap by four points last week.

In terms of race, Iowa’s pre-election voters are similar to this point in 2016, with white voters making up 94% of the early electorate.

Iowa, like some other states, did not see a major change in age. Voters under the age of 30 make up 10% of early voters – only three points more than they were four years ago. Voters 30-64 are now 47%, five points higher than the 42% who voted in this place four points ago. Voters 65 and older now have a smaller share of the initial electorate than they did four years ago.

Nevada

Nevada was narrowly different from Trump in defeat four years ago, with about two percentage points separating him from Hillary Clinton.

Nevada’s early voting voters are younger than they were last week. Eleven percent of voters so far are under the age of 30; Last week it was only 9%. Voters of 65 or more have gone from 40% of the initial voters last week to 35% now.

Two-thirds of Nevada’s pre-election vote comes from white voters, up from 70% four years ago. Hispanic voters have the second largest share of those votes at 13%, slightly higher than in 2016. Black voters and Asian voters saw a one percentage point increase in the share of early votes.

Republicans are downplaying the democratic advantage in the pre-election vote. Last week, Democrats led the Republicans by 12 points. With more votes being returned in the postal state by ballot, the 42% of votes cast by Democrats are now seven points higher than the 35% of Republicans.

Correction: The story has been updated to reflect Trump’s 2016 defeat in Nevada.

Earl Warner

"Devoted bacon guru. Award-winning explorer. Internet junkie. Web lover."

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