science

Hispanics and blacks died at a higher rate in the summer from Govt-19

Hispanics and black Americans are dying proportionately because of Govt-19, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States.

The study, published Friday in the Weekly Illness and Mortality Weekly report, looked at statistics on deaths caused by the epidemic over the summer.

Between May and August, 114,411 Americans lost their lives to Govt-19. Older white men are at a higher risk of death.

But despite being just 12.5% ​​of the American population, almost 18% of deaths during this period were black people. Hispanics make up more than 24% of the deaths, but make up 18.5% of the population.

In the summer the figures began to change. The percentage of Hispanics who died increased from 16% to 26% of the total deaths between May and August, while the death toll was lower in white or black.

The CDC said there was a geographical change in the deaths. The highest number of deaths at the beginning of the epidemic was in the Northeast, but that number moved west and south. The CDC argues that geographical difference cannot be attributed to an increase in the death rate in Hispanic society.

Researchers believe the epidemic was difficult in the Hispanic community because they may have had more exposure to Govt-19 due to their work. Hispanics are also more likely to live in multiple families or live with multiple generations in the same family, which makes social distance difficult.

Nearly a quarter of deaths from infection are in residential areas in group settings in a nursing home or long-term care facility. Those deaths occurred at the beginning of many epidemics. But as nursing homes stopped allowing outdoor visitors and more aggressively screened residents and isolated the sick, those deaths have decreased, and there has been a shift to younger and more unconstitutional populations during epidemics.

To control the spread of the disease, the CDC recommends that people use face masks, wash their hands frequently, keep body distance from others, and avoid large crowds.

Phil Schwartz

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